Arts

Arts & Life
11:35 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Sundance Festival Celebrates 30 Years Of Independence

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Way back in 1985 when I was hosting WEEKEND ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, I found myself interviewing Robert Redford about a new film festival sponsored by the Sundance Institute. Redford was enthusiastic about his film festival, showcasing independent film. He described it as far from Hollywood.

ROBERT REDFORD: It's free from the meter ticking of money and people in suits walking around looking at watches.

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Author Interviews
9:09 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Living, And 'Forgiving,' In A Brilliant Writer's Orbit

Knopf

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 11:35 am

A lot of writers can be fairly easily stereotyped. They write stories about dysfunctional families, star crossed lovers, endearing losers; they write historical fiction, literary fiction or crime novels. But Jay Cantor's body of work defies categorization. His fiction has been inspired by topics as wide-ranging as the revolutionary life of Che Guevara and the comic strip world of Krazy Kat.

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Movies
8:01 am
Sat January 18, 2014

'Lunch' Gets Boxed Out: India's Oscar Pick Controversy

Through a delivery accident, Saajan Fernandes (Irrfhan Khan) begins a correspondence (and love affair) with a despondent housewife in The Lunchbox.
Courtesy of Sony Classics

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:58 pm

The nominations for the Oscars were announced this week, and while many of the big contenders, such as 12 Years A Slave and The Wolf of Wall Street, weren't a surprise, there were some controversies in different categories. Top among the film-world controversies was India's submission for best foreign language film, The Good Road, a drama about a truck driver in the western Indian state of Gujarat.

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Author Interviews
5:32 am
Sat January 18, 2014

One Last Tale Of The City In 'Anna Madrigal'

promo image

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 11:35 am

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City began as a newspaper serial in the 1970s, and grew into a beloved series of books that stand as a chronicle of life in the city of San Francisco. And it began in the decade after the Summer of Love, before anyone had ever heard of AIDS — now, it will end in the era of marriage equality.

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This Week's Must Read
6:20 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

For Cheating Husbands, A Little Dose Of Revenge

cover detail

Sarah Wendell is the author of the book, Everything I Know about Love I Learned from Romance Novels. She is also the cofounder of the romance-reviewing website, smartbitchestrashybooks.com.

With French President Francois Hollande the focus of international headlines for cheating on his partner, Valerie Trierweiler — who is in the hospital due to the shock — a happy resolution to their problems seems unlikely.

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Book Reviews
6:20 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Rachel Joyce's 'Perfect' A Flawed, But Hopeful Novel

Courtesy of Random House

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 2:16 pm

It's 1972, when we meet 11-year-old Byron Hemmings, an English school boy living with his mother and sister in a country house. Byron's father Seymour works in the City (the financial district of London) and only comes home to see his family at the weekends. Though his work pays for the big house, the Jaguar that his wife drives and the private education his children receive, he is, in reality, only a visitor in their lives. Within several chapters one begins to believe that this is perhaps for the best — they don't seem a happy family.

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Author Interviews
4:25 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

A Strange Composition: Classical Music Meets Bioterror In 'Orfeo'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 8:33 pm

Richard Powers' new novel, Orfeo, tells the story of an avant-garde classical music composer who finds himself dabbling in DNA. Like the Orpheus myth that inspired the book's name, this story takes its hero, Peter Els, on a journey. He becomes a fugitive accused of bioterror, but what follows is also a walk back into the recesses of his own memory told through the music and people he's loved and lost.

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Monkey See
1:37 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

You Can Now Send Someone You Temporarily Like A 'Bachelor' Bouquet

This is a real press release photo of the Bachelor bouquet.
Warner Brothers Entertainment

It's Friday, so let's take a moment to consider the greatest press release of the week. (And by "greatest," I mean "most ridiculous." As always.)

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The Salt
1:31 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Diet Soda: Fewer Calories In The Glass May Mean More On The Plate

Ditching sugar-sweetened drinks in favor of diet ones shaves the empty calories. But it doesn't help if you make up for those calories on your plate.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 1:17 pm

If only dropping pants sizes were as easy as switching from Coke to Coke Zero.

Sure, you're cutting out empty calories when you ditch the sugar-sweetened drinks in favor of artificially sweetened ones. But there's a growing body of research that suggests this isn't really helping in the battle of the bulge.

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Remembrances
12:09 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Did Author Amiri Baraka 'Remix' Who He Was?

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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