Arts

The Salt
1:24 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Long John Silver's Throws Trans Fats Overboard

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 4:22 pm

Long John Silver's has gained some notoriety in the past for serving up what the food police dubbed the most unhealthful meal in America. (aka heart attack on a hook.)

But the fast-food chain is out to change its reputation. One step in this new direction: a quick transition from partially hydrogenated oils that contain bedeviled trans fats. Today, the chain announced it is moving to a 100 percent soybean oil that is trans-fat free.

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Arts
12:40 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Authors Dr. Joel Nathan Rosen and Dr. David Ogden on Arts Salon

  Host Bathsheba Monk fires the starting gun on a New Year of Lehigh Valley Arts Salon by welcoming to the show editors of and contributors to the new book of essays, A Locker Room of Her Own: Celebrity, Sexuality and Female Athletes. This is the third book in a series about sports edited by Dr. Joel Nathan Rosen and Dr. David C. Ogden.  Dr. Martha Reid, who wrote the lead essay in the book, will join what promises to be a lively discussion about women in professional sports. (Original air-date January 6, 2014).

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Book Reviews
12:00 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

New Mavis Staples Biography Will 'Take You There'

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 9:33 pm

There are vocalists, there are singers and then there are voices — the first aims for the ear, the second for the brain, the third for the heart. A voice turns a composition into an emotional experience. And each time we have that experience, it's the depth of the connection that we remember. Frank Sinatra was a voice. So too were Marvin Gaye, George Jones and Billie Holiday. Aretha Franklin is a voice. So is Bob Dylan. And so is the Staple Singers' Mavis Staples.

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The Two-Way
8:06 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Book News: Kenyan Writer Comes Out In Defiance Of Anti-Gay Laws

Binyavanga Wainaina, editor of Kwani?, in 2003 in Nairobi, Kenya.
Khalil Senosi AP

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 1:17 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Kitchen Window
7:48 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Sea Scallops: A Winter Treat From Maine's Chilly Waters

Laura McCandlish for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 9:52 am

A joy of living in Maine is year-round access to bountiful, relatively affordable, ultra-fresh seafood. Sure, there's the ubiquitous lobster, especially plentiful come summer.

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Book Reviews
7:02 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Music And Chemistry Are An Explosive Combination In 'Orfeo'

W.W. Norton

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 2:47 pm

Richard Powers, whose novels combine the wonders of science with the marvels of art, astonishes us in different ways with each new book. His 11th, Orfeo, is about a 70-year-old avant-garde composer who has sacrificed family and fortune to his relentless pursuit of immortal, transcendent music.

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Fine Art
6:12 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Which Artworks Should We Save? Cash-Strapped Italy Lets Citizens Vote

In a program called L'Arte Auita L'Arte (Art Helping Art) Italy's Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism posted works of art in need of restoration on Facebook. The public was asked to vote for the art it felt was most deserving of a fix-up.
Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism via Facebook

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 10:37 am

When it comes to Italy's enormous art heritage, officials are often faced with an unbearable choice: Which pieces should be saved when the government can't afford to save them all? Now, thanks to an online vote, it's up to Italian citizens to answer that tough question. In the end, some art will get a new lease on life, but many works that epitomize Western civilization remain seriously in danger.

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Monkey See
2:05 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

As NBC Prepares For A Late-Night Transition, Everyone Is On Message (So Far)

Producer Josh Lieb (L) and host Jimmy Fallon talk to critics on Sunday about what's to come.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

It felt like a rerun from a long-ago time, with a twist.

Once again, an NBC executive was facing a crowd of TV critic and reporters, saying nice things about Jay Leno just as he was leaving as host of The Tonight Show.

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Movie Interviews
1:11 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Phoenix To Self: 'Why Am I Talking About This? ... Joaquin, Shut Up'

Joaquin Phoenix's Her character, Theodore, has a job writing intimate — and sometimes erotic — cards and letters on behalf of other people.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:56 pm

Joaquin Phoenix started his acting career in 1982, when he was about 8, on an episode of the TV series Seven Brides For Seven Brothers. (His brother, the late River Phoenix, was a regular in the series.) He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he still vividly remembers his first time on a set.

"I remember feeling like I was buzzing, like my whole body was vibrating, because it was just so exciting to experience this thing that wasn't real but at moments felt like it was real," he says. "It's basically the feeling that I've been chasing ever since."

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The Salt
9:46 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Soba: More Than Just Noodles, It's A Cultural Heritage ... And An Art Form

Genuine soba noodles are difficult to find in the U.S.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 12:10 pm

Traditional Japanese cuisine, known as washoku, is now an intangible cultural heritage, according to the United Nations.

Tofu, mochi and miso are a few examples, but it's the buckwheat noodle, or soba, that many consider the humble jewel of Japanese cuisine. It's not easy to find in the U.S., but one Los Angeles woman is helping preserve the craft of making soba.

In a cooking classroom off a busy street in L.A., Sonoko Sakai is teaching about the simplicity of making buckwheat noodles.

"Basically, soba is only two things: flour and water," Sakai explains.

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