Arts

Television
5:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Fumbling Through 'Fatherhood,' Even With The Best Advice

Fatherhood is Hank Azaria's new documentary series on the triumphs and challenges of becoming a dad.
AOL

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:49 am

Actor Hank Azaria wasn't sure he wanted to become a father.

"I am not a children kind of person," he says in the first episode of Fatherhood, his new AOL documentary series. "I feel about kids the way I feel about most people. Which is, most of them are annoying. Children are no exception — they're just annoying short people."

So Azaria set out to document his quest for parental wisdom, quizzing his friends, poker buddies and experts about why they chose to become parents.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:15 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Get Ready To Flip Your Lid

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "One, Two, Three — Flip!" The answer will come in the form of two words, and for each word you'll get a clue beforehand. Reverse the order of the first three letters of the first word to get the second word. Example: Cavalry sword and more villainous = SABER, BASER.

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Movie Interviews
8:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Disney's First Crop Of Trained Animators, Profiled

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

The first generation of animators to attend Walt Disney's California Institute of the Arts in the 1970s is profiled in Vanity Fair magazine. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Nancy Beiman, who was part of that first class.

Movies
5:28 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Martin Scorsese Takes Poland's Communist-Era Art Films On The Road

The hero of Andrzej Wajda's Ashes And Diamonds is torn between fighting Poland's post-World War II communist regime and returning to a normal, peaceful life.
Courtesy of Milestone Film

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

Martin Scorsese fell in love with Polish movies when he was in college.

"The images have stayed in my head for so many years, since the late '50s," he says. "I close my eyes, I see them, especially from Ashes And Diamonds, from The Saragossa Manuscript. They're very vivid, expressive, immediate."

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NPR Story
5:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

Adolf Hitler salutes to a crowd of soldiers at a Nazi rally in 1938. Years later, in the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 9:18 pm

In the fall of 1944, the United States and its allies launched a secret mission code-named Operation Paperclip. The aim was to find and preserve German weapons, including biological and chemical agents, but American scientific intelligence officers quickly realized the weapons themselves were not enough.

They decided the United States needed to bring the Nazi scientists themselves to the U.S. Thus began a mission to recruit top Nazi doctors, physicists and chemists — including Wernher von Braun, who went on to design the rockets that took man to the moon.

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Three Books...
3:43 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Muses And More: 3 Books We Owe To Writers' Lovers

Many writers used their romantic partners as inspiration for characters and plot lines: Tolstoy's courtship of his wife, Sophia, became the model for Levin's wooing of Kitty in Anna Karenina, while Gustave Flaubert shamelessly infused intimate details about his mistress into the titular Madame Bovary. But some scribes owe much more to their significant others. These career-defining books might never have graced our shelves if it weren't for writers' strong-willed other halves.

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Digital Life
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

An App On The Search For The Secret To Happiness

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Social scientists have a new way of researching happiness. Now, for years you had to ask somebody why they were happy in order study what makes somebody happy, but that's been hard to do every minute of every day until now. Guy Raz of the TED Radio Hour explains.

GUY RAZ, BYLINE: Matt Killingsworth is a scientist who...

MATT KILLINGSWORTH: ...studies the causes and nature of human happiness.

RAZ: Which used to mean bringing people to a lab and interviewing them and trying to figure out...

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Arts & Life
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

The Thousands Of Ways To Tie A Tie

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Author Interviews
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

'Eliot Ness': Actually Untouchable, Except When It Came To Women

Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:44 pm

Hollywood's been known to dramatize even the most dramatic of real-life narratives. So of course the real Eliot Ness wasn't nearly as dashing as Robert Stack or Kevin Costner (although maybe he was).

He wasn't a G-man; he never carried an FBI badge. Nor was he the lawman who brought the tax case that put away America's most famous mobster, Al Capone — even though the Capone case made him a household name. But he was a genuine pioneer of modern police work.

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Author Interviews
9:54 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Through The Mind Of A Novelist, Lincoln Shares His Life Story

Jerome Charyn is the author of nearly 50 books, a variety of fiction and nonfiction.
Mariana Cook Courtesy of Liveright

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:43 pm

Abraham Lincoln may be the most biographied, analyzed, deified, second-guessed and impersonated figure in U.S. history. He's been seen as Carl Sandburg's mournful prairie genius and Gore Vidal's shrewd railroad lawyer, who knew when to play the rube.

He's been portrayed in comprehensive histories by James McPherson, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and hundreds more in the sweeping movies of John Ford and Steven Spielberg.

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