Arts

Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Boy Scouts, Bad Girls And The Hitler Youth

Teenage is composed almost entirely of archival footage, including images of American and British flappers of the 1920s.
Oscilloscope

Painted lips, slicked-back hair and pumping fists form the core of Matt Wolf's documentary Teenage, an impressionistic history of how our concept of the teenager came to be. Composed almost entirely of dazzling archival footage — young people laboring, exercising, fighting, dancing, drinking and playing — the film traces the history of the teenager from the late 19th century to 1945.

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Arts & Life
4:28 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Amtrak Opens The Door To Writing On The Rails

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 6:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Things can take off fast on Twitter. And that's what happened when a couple of writers expressed how much they like riding trains, Amtrak specifically. It started with an idea: Wouldn't it be great if Amtrak would offer writers a chance to ride the rails for free and do some writing along the way? Soon, the idea was being tweeted and retweeted, and Amtrak replied: Sure.

NPR's Leah Binkovitz explains.

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Book Reviews
4:28 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

When You Befriend A Killer, You Can't Not Write About It

In addition to Blood Will Out, Walter Kirn is the author of four works of fiction and one other work of nonfiction.
Beowulf Sheehan Courtesy of Liveright Publishing

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:07 am

Nonfiction writers often have to go scrounging for their dream subject. They may buy themselves a ticket to some far-flung place, or join an Iditarod team, or start researching a historical figure who seems to have led a colorful life. Sometimes, writers are fortunate enough to already have a personal passion for one subject, and writing a book about it seems only natural.

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The Salt
2:44 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Top 5 Ways Asparagus, A Rite Of Spring, Can Still Surprise

From the botanical to the economic, spring's iconic vegetable still harbors surprises.
Sharon Mollerus/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 6:35 pm

As the snow melts, even in Minnesota, and daylight lingers into evening, people who like to eat with the seasons know what's coming: asparagus.

"Asparagus means the beginning of spring. It's spring!" says Nora Pouillon, chef and founder of Restaurant Nora in Washington, D.C. Later this month, she'll revise her menu, and it will certainly include asparagus with salmon, and asparagus soup.

It's an elegant vegetable, Pouillon says, and unique: "Sweet and bitter at the same time."

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The Salt
1:34 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

A Major In Coffee? UC Davis Might Be Brewing One Up

The University of California, Davis, recently founded a Coffee Center dedicated to the study of the beloved brew.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 5:22 pm

Many of us have those friends who insist that they're coffee connoisseurs and drink exclusively drip brews. But really, there aren't many academic programs that train people in the taste and science of coffee.

That might all change soon. The University of California, Davis, recently founded a Coffee Center dedicated to the study of the world of java. This week, the center held its first research conference.

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The Protojournalist
1:11 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Forget Speed-Reading. Here's Speed-Writing

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:43 am

Speed-reading all rage. Suddenly many speed-reading apps. Spritz. Spreeder. Others.

Some inspired by method RSVP — rapid serial visual presentation.

"Rather than read words

from left to right,"

says Marc Slater, managing director of Spreeder parent company eReflect.

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Ask Me Another
11:12 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Adam Savage: Bust That Myth!

Adam Savage has the coolest, and perhaps most dangerous, job in the world.
Jakub Mosur

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:43 pm

Adam Savage, along with partner-in-science (and snark) Jamie Hyneman, has tested over 800 myths, used 12 tons of explosives and destroyed over 100 cars on the hit TV show Mythbusters. Not only is his job incredibly cool--it's often incredibly dangerous.

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Ask Me Another
11:11 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Yahoo, Seriously? With Farhad Manjoo

Farhad Manjoo at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco.
Jakub Mosur

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 11:19 am

Who's a "dead guy with crazy hair because he invented physics"? In this game, The New York Times' tech columnist Farhad Manjoo and his opponent try to identify historic figures from dubious Yahoo! Answers descriptions.

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Ask Me Another
11:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Outta This World

"TYLER'S HOUSE!" This will all make sense once you hear the game. Promise!
Jakub Mosur

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 11:22 am

We're going galactic with this final round. Play along as puzzle guru Art Chung quizzes contestants on some truly extraterrestrial trivia, in which the answers are all things found in outer space.

Plus, V.I.P. Danny Pudi presents the grand winner with a one-of-a-kind prize: a personalized song, sung in Pudi's native Polish.

Heard in Episode 311: Puzzlin' On The Dock Of The Bay

Ask Me Another
11:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Danny Pudi: What's My One-Liner?

Danny Pudi, at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco, where Ask Me Another performed as part of SF Sketchfest, the comedy festival.
Jakub Mosur

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:09 pm

  • Danny serenades the grand winner in Polish
  • Danny talks about his documentary, "Untucked"

You might expect that the actor who's brought Community's most idiosyncratic character, Abed, to life, with such skill and empathy must relate to him in some way. Danny Pudi admits that while he's not so similar to his encyclopedically-inclined alter ego (save one incident of lighting himself on fire as a teenager), there is one area in which the actor and the character overlap: their love of film.

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