Arts

The Salt
3:25 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The Search For The Perfect Cup Of Coffee Can Be Such A Grind(er)

Doug and Barb Garrott assemble a Lido 2 grinder at their home in Troy, Idaho. They've spent the past three years perfecting their design for the hand-cranked machine.
Jessica Greene

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 8:31 am

In the tiny town of Troy, Idaho, Barb and Doug Garrott have spent the past three years perfecting a machine that could change the morning routines of coffee drinkers all over the country: a $175 hand-cranked coffee grinder.

It's called the Lido 2, the first run of 500 has already sold out on preorder, and coffee aficionados are asking for more.

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Arts
1:42 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Touchstone Theatre on Lehigh Valley Art Salon

Touchstone Theatre's latest community-based initiative, Journey from the East explores the history of Chinese immigration in the Lehigh Valley.  The first of two productions, "Journey: Dream of the Red Pavilion," will run from April 3 - 13.

Hosts Kate Scuffle and George Miller talk with author and director, Mary Wright, and Touchstone's general manager and ensemble member, Emma Chong, about this theatrical, human journey and what it takes to put it all onstage. (Original air-date March 24, 2014).

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Performing Arts
1:34 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

From Walter White To LBJ, Bryan Cranston Is A Master Of Transformation

Over the course of Breaking Bad, Walter White (Bryan Cranston) metamorphosed from a high school chemistry teacher to a notorious outlaw.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 3:15 pm

In the 2008 pilot of AMC's Breaking Bad, high school teacher Walter White fails to interest his chemistry students in the study of change. But over the course of the series, Walt himself came to exemplify radical change, using his knowledge of chemistry to become a master meth cook, and transforming himself into a notorious outlaw who was willing to kill, when necessary, to keep his operation running.

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Ask Me Another
10:02 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part III: Dessert

Start with a musical game that "Sounds Delicious," then find a challenge in "Crisp Game Arenas"— and identify dishes from anagrams. For a palate cleanser, enjoy a final round that is all about water.

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Ask Me Another
10:02 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part II: Dinner

Hear Bon Appetit editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport dish about his dislike of the term "foodie" and play a game based on fast food Yelp! reviews. Plus, mash up foods and bands at the "Soft Rock Cafe."

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Ask Me Another
10:02 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Foodie Favorites, Part I: Brunch

Dig in as we revisit "Breakfast Cereal Haiku," a game that puts a poetic spin on your favorite childhood cereals, and "Natalie Portmantoast," in which we mash up celebrities with the names of foods.

Heard in Episode 005: Foodie Favorites

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Monkey See
9:50 am
Thu March 27, 2014

'Tell Me Two Things Good': A Happiness Experiment

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:16 pm

One of my old pals used to come walking into a room at the end of a long day, sigh, look around, and say, "Tell me two things good." They could be big things, small things, anything — he had to hear two things, and they had to be good things, and you had to think of them right away.

Wednesday night, I asked Twitter this crucial question. Here are some of the responses.

The Two-Way
7:31 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Book News: Shaken, Stirred: Ian Fleming's Racy Love Letters To Be Sold

Ian Fleming, best-selling British author and creator of James Bond, is seen in this 1962 photo.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
7:03 am
Thu March 27, 2014

March 22-28: The CIA, Central Bankers And Summer Camp

Cover of The Alchemists

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Theater
2:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

At 81, Playwright Athol Fugard Looks Back On Aging And Apartheid

In 1961, South African playwright Athol Fugard put black and white actors on stage together in his breakout play Blood Knot. He's pictured above in the 1970s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:18 pm

Under apartheid, trying to make an artistic political statement was difficult — artists were subject to scrutiny and even arrest. On the other hand, making a political statement was easy: All one had to do was put black and white actors on a stage together.

That's exactly what South African playwright Athol Fugard did back in 1961 with his breakout play Blood Knot. His newest play, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, is now onstage at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn.

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