Arts

Arts & Life
7:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Strategic Seating: How To Elicit The Optimal Dinner Conversation

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Alex Cornell does not like dinner parties or overly chatty commuters who insist upon talking to him on the bus. So, he created a new app called Tickle, which helps you escape awkward public situations. By simply touching the phone, you can generate a fake phone call, allowing you to politely excuse yourself. The app isn't out yet, but it reminded us of another one of Alex Cornell's attempts to avoid awkward conversations. We spoke to the San Francisco-based blogger and designer last year.

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Author Interviews
7:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

A Libertarian With Roots In Rock Music

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to hear now how a prominent libertarian found his political voice.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Matt Kibbe was just 13 when he fell under the spell of a certain rock band.

MATT KIBBE: Well, I was listening to a lot of Led Zeppelin, but it was the band Rush really got me starting to read and pay attention to ideas.

MARTIN: On the Rush album, "2112," the band sings of a futuristic society, in which thought and expression are controlled by a top-down autocracy.

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Around the Nation
7:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

1,000 Farmworkers View Chavez Film, Dedicated To Them

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A new feature film about the early days of Cesar Chavez opened this weekend. The story of the legendary activist who took on the powerful agricultural industry was directed by Mexican actor Diego Luna. This past week, the filmmakers treated an audience of California farm workers to an outdoor preview of the movie dubbed into Spanish.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco was there.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Miss Lonelyhearts No More: Three Surprising Books of Advice

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:20 pm

It amazes me that those of us who bridle at advice from people we know — parents, spouses, neighbors — crave it from those strangers we call authors. Stand in front of any magazine rack and gaze upon the endless lists of promises on the covers: advice on how to publish your first novel, lose weight, or put that spark back into your love life. Think of that corner in the bookstore devoted to "Self-improvement." Books with "how to" in the title — including my latest effort — number in the thousands.

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Movie Interviews
5:11 am
Sun March 30, 2014

One Documentary Later, Rumsfeld's Inner World Remains 'Unknown'

Donald Rumsfeld, shown here on a 2006 visit to Iraq, was the Secretary of Defense during the beginning of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Errol Morris spent over 30 hours interviewing Rumsfeld for his latest documentary.
USMC Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:03 pm

Filmmaker Errol Morris is famous for trying to get inside other people's minds and understand the motivations behind the choices they've made. In his most famous film, The Fog of War, Morris sat down one-on-one with former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara to talk about the decisions McNamara made in Vietnam. During the course of the conversation, McNamara makes the stunning admission that some of his actions amounted to war crimes.

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All Tech Considered
5:11 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Printing Wikipedia Would Take 1 Million Pages, But That's Sort Of The Point

It would take more than 1,000 1,200-page volumes to contain the content of Wikipedia, but PediaPress has made an example volume to show what it might look like. "Our goal is to allow everyone to explore the physical dimensions of Wikipedia," says PediaPress founder Christoph Kepper.
PediaPress

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 2:55 pm

A German-based group called PediaPress is trying to raise enough money to make a print copy of all of Wikipedia. That's right, Wikipedia, the ever-evolving, always-changing, inherently digital encyclopedia of information gathered by contributors all over the world. To say this would be a massive project is an understatement.

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Movie Interviews
5:10 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Cambodia's 'Missing Pictures' Molded From Director's Own Life

In The Missing Picture, director Rithy Panh uses clay figurines to recall his experience of the genocide in Cambodia at the hands of the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s.
Strand Releasing

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 5:59 pm

The genocide in Cambodia in the 1970s at the hands of the Khmer Rouge has inspired many books and movies, most famously the 1984 Oscar-winner The Killing Fields. But the most unusual might be this year's Oscar-nominated film The Missing Picture. In it, filmmaker Rithy Panh uses clay figurines to recall his experience of genocide.

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The Protojournalist
7:13 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Vladimir Putin Is Right Out Of A Russian Novel

Russian President Vladimir Putin stands in the shadow of the Fyodor Dostoyevsky monument in Dresden, Germany, 2006.
SEBASTIAN WILLNOW AFP/Getty Images

"Russia is a hypothetical culture. Ruled by despots for most of our history, we are used to living in fiction rather than reality," writes Nina L. Khrushcheva, who teaches international affairs at The New School. She is also the great granddaughter of the late communist leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev.

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Movie Interviews
5:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

In Biblical Blockbuster, Aronofsky Rocks Noah's Boat

The heavens open on Russell Crowe, as Noah, in the new Bible-based film.
Niko Tavernise Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

The Biblical tale of Noah's Ark isn't the likeliest of big screen blockbusters. But that didn't stop Darren Aronofsky (Requiem for a Dream, The Fountain, Black Swan) from pitching it to a Hollywood studio.

"When I first went to the studio, I said, 'Hey, what's the only boat more famous than the Titanic?' " he tells NPR's Kelly McEvers.

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Television
5:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Inside 'Regular Show,' Where Every Clip Is A Big Production

J.G. Quintel is the creator of Regular Show and the voice of one of its main characters, Mordecai.
Cartoon Network

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

In its fifth season, Cartoon Network's Regular Show has gained fans of all ages. Each 11-minute episode of the Emmy-winning series starts with pencils and Post-it notes.

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