Arts

Movie Interviews
2:25 pm
Tue August 18, 2015

Lily Tomlin At 75: The Actress Discusses Great Roles, Old Cars And Coming Out

Actress Lily Tomlin (second from right) poses with wife writer Jane Wagner (second from left) and friends Elaine Barbour (left) and Vivian Schneider before the 2014 Kennedy Center Honors in Washington.
Mike Theiler Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 7:47 am

The star of the film Grandma and the Netflix series Grace and Frankie married her partner of 42 years, Jane Wagner, in 2013. She spoke with Fresh Air about being more open about her sexuality.

"I've been out for ... 10 or 11 or 12 years or something. I mean, finally somebody printed it. ... [If asked about her sexuality during a 1989 interview with Terry Gross] I probably would have said something like, um ... 'yes, I am.' I couldn't have lied โ€” it would have been too diminishing to lie."

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Movies
1:52 pm
Tue August 18, 2015

Documentary Revisits The 'Dazzling' Polemics Of The Buckley-Vidal Debates

William F. Buckley (left) and Gore Vidal square off on Nov. 5, 1968.
ABC Photo Archives ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 2:25 pm

After the Republicans held their lively first debate, you heard people saying what they always say nowadays โ€” that our media-driven political discourse has become shallow and petty, even clownish. Hearing this, an innocent young person might believe that, not so long ago, America was a latter-day Athens in which political arguments were magnificent in their purity and eloquence.

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Monkey See
11:23 am
Tue August 18, 2015

Television 2015: With 25 Ways To Watch TV, Does The House Always Win?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 1:45 pm

This is one in a series of essays running this week and next about the state of television in 2015. The series is based on developments at the recent Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., where broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, presented new and existing shows to TV critics and reporters.

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Book Reviews
10:03 am
Tue August 18, 2015

'Dark, Dark' Doings In A Slick Debut Thriller

Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 11:21 am

I am slightly embarrassed to admit I had never before encountered the term "hen party" before reading Ruth Ware's suspenseful debut novel In a Dark, Dark Wood. Like so many phrases that describe all-female gatherings, such as quilting bee or kaffeeklatsch, that hen business has a slight cluck of the patronizing to it. That one of the main characters here is nicknamed "Flopsy" doesn't help things along any.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue August 18, 2015

Social Satire, Spiked With Schadenfreude In 'Everybody Rise'

Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 10:03 am

New York Times reporter Stephanie Clifford's ambitious debut novel, Everybody Rise, about a young social climber desperately trying to claw her way to the top of New York's Old Money society, takes its title from the last lines of Stephen Sondheim's bitter toast of a song, "The Ladies Who Lunch." But its inspiration (like that of Sophie McManus' The Unfortunates, another much buzzed first novel this summer) springs from Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth.

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Fine Art
4:48 am
Tue August 18, 2015

Durand-Ruel: The Art Dealer Who Liked Impressionists Before They Were Cool

Paul Durand-Ruel, shown above in his gallery in 1910, acquired some 5,000 impressionist works โ€” long before others were buying them.
Dornac Durand-Ruel & Cie/Courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 9:33 am

It might seem unusual for an exhibit to focus on a man who sold paintings rather than the artists who painted them. But there was one particular 19th century Paris art dealer who shaped the art market of his day โ€” and ours โ€” by discovering artists who became world-wide favorites. He's now the subject of a major exhibition in Philadelphia.

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The Salt
4:59 pm
Mon August 17, 2015

Guzzling 9,000 Years Of History With 'The Comic Book Story Of Beer'

Random House

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 3:08 pm

In ancient times, farmers worried about losing precious grain to spoilage during wet winters. So they figured out how to malt grain and brew it into beer, thus preserving a nutritious source of calories. In The Comic Book Story of Beer, due out in September, we get a graphical tour of such pivotal moments โ€” from the cradle of agriculture to the modern-day craft beer heyday.

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Theater
2:45 pm
Mon August 17, 2015

Lesbian Cartoonist Alison Bechdel Countered Dad's Secrecy By Being Out And Open

Alison Bechdel is the author of the long-running syndicated comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For.
Elena Seibert Courtesy of O+M Co.

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 5:18 pm

Since coming out as a lesbian in 1980 at the age of 19, graphic novelist Alison Bechdel has made it a point to be open about her sexuality. It was a decision she made consciously as a reaction to her father, who was gay and closeted, and who died four months after Bechdel came out.

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Arts
11:27 am
Mon August 17, 2015

The Kemerer Museum's Steampunk Exhibit on LV Arts Salon

In the spirit of the current "Steampunk" exhibit at the Kemerer Museum, Historic Bethlehem Museums & Sites will host an End of Summer White Party & Steampunk Fashion Show on August 20th, featuring embellished garments styled by RC Moore.
ย 
Rose Ellen Moore of RCMoore Fashions and Melanie Depcinsky, Director ofย  Visitor Experience for Kemerer Museum, join hosts George Miller and Kate Scuffle to discuss the exhibit, the party, and what's next at the Kemerer Museum.

(Original air-date: 8/10/2015)

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Monkey See
11:07 am
Mon August 17, 2015

Television 2015: Full Drops And Single Shots

Uzo Aduba and Samira Wiley in Orange Is the New Black, one of the many series now delivered in one big bundle.
JoJo Whilden Netflix

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 12:19 pm

This is one in a series of essays running this week and next about the state of television in 2015. The series is based on developments at the recent Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., where broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, presented new and existing shows to TV critics and reporters.

Read more

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